Scooters Come Back

In the AGM held in August 2018, Rajiv Bajaj, the MD of Bajaj auto was subjected to the ever-present question by the shareholders. When will Bajaj scooters make a come back? This question had become a permanent fixture in the AGM’s held by the Pune based automobile maker. Every meeting, someone or the other would ask this question and Mr. Bajaj would duck or dodge the question. Not this time. This time he lost his cool and said “I will make scooters when Royal Enfield makes scooters”.

I will make Scooters when Royal Enfield makes Scooters.

Source

The less than composed outburst made headlines. We do like our punch lines don’t we? Mr. Bajaj went on to elaborate on his illustration. His point was, no one can be the best in all segments. Bajaj is the 4th largest manufacturer of the two wheelers in India. The two wheeler industry itself is a huge mix of scooters, motorbikes, sports bikes and elite high power bikes. His idea is, no one can be the champion in all the segments. OK, so does Bajaj lead in any segment? Yes, actually the three wheeler category is where Bajaj shines, the Autos. Its not the only segment; Bajaj Pulsar is a household name and one of the most selling two wheeler motorbikes in the country.

Two Wheeler Market

He also explained that the scooters first of all, are a small part of the two and three wheelers segment, secondly Honda is way ahead in the scooter game with the Honda Activa selling more than 100 thousand units a month.

So to sum up, he wasn’t interested in going into the scooter segment because:
a) He didn’t think the scooter segment was profitable enough – given that scooters sell for far less than a motorbike and that the margins are low, it seemed a low hanging fruit.
b) The scooter segment is already over crowded with Honda doing too well and TVS fighting hard to make the numbers.

Ok, now let us look at his statement. How can he say I will make scooters when Royal Enfield makes scooter? RE never made scooters, but Bajaj did, and Bajaj made great scooters. What the shareholders are asking is for a come back of the scooter. The Scooters of Bajaj are emotionally etched to the Indian psyche. A feel good factor, a nostalgia of the 90s and 80s when our fathers owned a scooter is what is making everyone ask for a scooter.

Bajaj Chetak

Emotions are not the only thing involved in the idea of bringing scooters back, of course its a huge risk. The scooters of Bajaj were of a different generation. Today’s scooters are mostly grearles automatics used by children or women who want to drive a lightweight, automatic two wheeler. Not the kind of Scooters that Bajaj made or the kind that the market wants Bajaj to bring back. Infact, except for LML in Punjab, today there are hardly any geared scooters in the Indian market today.

Aren’t there examples of old brands making a come back? The biggest example in the world is the Volkswagen Beetle. The 1938 model sold for nearly 40 before phasing out in the 70s. The model was so loved that when the company reintroduced it in 1998, it was an instant hit. It sold in the a hundred thousand units annually for nearly 10 years! Of course the numbers started falling again, and VW introduced a newer, more masculine version in 2011. The car has been out of fashion in 2019, but was one of the greatest comeback stories of the century.

Beetle 1998

Talking more closer to home, Royal Enfield itself is a comeback story. The chivalrous motorbike maker typically made motorbikes for the military and paramilitary forces, and very few owned the bike. It wasn’t till the 2000s that the bike started making a comeback. People wanted to own the Bullet, look tough and be part of the movement. The movement is still going strong and RE is making quite a buck.

So why can’t Bajaj bring back scooters? It’s not like Bajaj didn’t try its hand at selling the new generation gearless scooters. There was a model called Bajaj Kristal that was released in the 2000s. This model failed and with that Bajaj ended it’s venture into scooters. Which is really really sad.

Red Ocean

The fear of entering an already competitive market is not a sign of a good business. Its not just being risk averse, but its just throwing in your towel without getting into the ring.

The best example for this is the entry of TVS in the three wheeler market. The auto rickshaw market. Bajaj has historically owned this place. Even today Bajaj owns more than 50% of the market share in this segment. Yet TVS ventured into this market in the late 2000s and has since been chewing away market share. That is a sign of positivity and intent from a business that we as investors and shareholder look for. Why can’t Bajaj take cue from this move by TVS and take a change at entering the scooter market?

Three wheeler Market

The entry of TVS is not the only example of a new player entering an already saturated market. In the second decade of 2000, electric three wheelers have also come into the forray, and as a pleasant and path breaking news, the sales of electric three wheelers has for the first time surpassed the sales of petrol/diesel/CNG/LPG vehicles.

TVS Three Wheelers

As per data shared by the Society of Manufacturers of Electric Vehicles (SMEV), the apex lobby body for electric vehicles, sales of electric three-wheeler segment grew 21 percent during 2018-19 to 630,000 as against 520,000 sold in 2017-18. In 2018, sales of petrol, diesel and CNG-powered passenger three wheelers grew by just 10.6 percent to 572,400 units, compared to 517,400 units sold in 2017-18, according to data shared by the Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers.

King of the Hill

As we already saw, Bajaj is not the king of the hill. It comes off as a distant 4th when it comes to manufacturing and sales of two wheelers in the country. The bike that is on top of things is the Pulsar, but even that has stiff competition with other street bikes like the TVS Apache and Honda CBR. So where then does Bajaj see the money to be so adamantly stuck only in the motorbike segment of this huge market?

The partnerships. KTM has been a famous name in the domestic motorbike segment. KTM RC 200 and KTM 390 have been selling hot on the streets of the bigger and smaller cities of India. KTM has a manufacturing and marketing partnership with Bajaj. Hence is eating off a fair slice of action. KTM is not the only partnership game of Bajaj; not so long back they had partnership with Kawasaki, and the most recent partnership they’ve announced is with Triumph. Do these partnerships mean Bajaj can make enough money and move up in the market share? Not likely.

Partnerships

Of the top 10 bike awaited bike launches in 2019-20 FY, there is just 1 Bajaj bike – the Bajaj Dominor 400, and 2 other bikes from partnerships. Yamaha is planning to launch 3, Hero, Aprilia and RE are planning to launch 1 bike each. So clearly, Bajaj isn’t really pushing too hard to make it to the top.

So what do we have now?

  1. Bajaj isn’t the best in motorbikes and isn’t likely to be anytime soon
  2. Entering an already saturated market is not unheard off
  3. Brands that have had a special place have made successful comebacks

Why after all this does Bajaj want to stay out of the scooter segment? Because its too little money? or because its too much work? or is it because it’s just not fashionable anymore? Its here that we must recall that Rajiv Bajaj is not the one who made the company.

This reminds me of a line from Psalm 37 –  The righteous shall inherit the land and dwell upon it forever. Unrelated question: Who’s the righteous one here? Rajiv Bajaj or the Scooter that we loved so much?

~*~

Hoping Against Hope

On the auspicious day of the official FIFA world cup qualifier draw, we were hit with some bad news. Goal.com which is literally the mouthpiece of IMG Reliance and FSDL made a post speculating the exit of Bengaluru FC from their home ground of Sree Kanteerava Stadium in Bengaluru. It was a jolt! This had been our home since 2016 when we bid adieu to the smaller and astroturf-ed Bangalore Football Stadium since the number of fans had outgrown the 8000 seater.

Without going into details, lets understand that the news is not new that the Athletics Association of the Karnataka and Bengaluru FC have been fighting a turf battle in the Kanteerava. Now Kanteerava is a multipurpose stadium – most stadiums in India are. Hence the athletes of different track and field sports need the stadium to practice. When Bengaluru FC or BFC for cuteness, has a game coming up, it takes over the pitch for 2 to 3 days. This obviously creates problems for the athletes of other sports and hence the tiff. There has recently been a court order by the High Court of Karnataka that the stadium needs to be used only for athletics purpose and BFC needs to make way.

I just couldn’t believe it. Many couldn’t believe it. Staunch BFC supporters and fans were in disbelief and then in denial that we could actually lose our home. Many went on to create social media petitions and tried to spam or slander with FSDL, IMG reliance and even AIFF.

But inside, there was a hope that things will be fine and we will find a way through this. We will still play at our home ground. But what’s the reason behind this mad hope? Well nothing. The case as it stands doesn’t allow us to play in the Kanteerava stadium and the case will come up next for hearing only in October, by when our season would’ve already started. So why this hope? Why this belief of things are going to be good? I looked it up.

Apparently there is something called the Delusion of Reprieve. It was first found in Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E Frankl.

The condemned man, immediately before his execution, gets the illusion that he might be reprieved at the very last minute.

Source

Basically, Mad hope.

This struck me hard. Not the meaning of Delusion of Reprieve but the fact that it happens so frequently in our lives. The earliest of examples I can think of from my life is when we first moved to the suburbs. There were only 2 buses to our house and it took a full hour to make the round trip. We would wait at the school bus stop waiting for the bus. It would get late, real late and we would know the bus isn’t coming this hour, but yet we would stand there and turn up at every sound of a heavy vehicle.

It also happens on a bad day at poker. It happens to everyone that you’re just dealt with bad hands. You check, bet low and fold time and again, and yet you continue to play. Hoping, and earnestly believing that the next hand is going to be good.

The easiest example that everyone will be able to relate is school. Don’t we all remember the days when hoped against hope that a certain teacher wouldn’t turn up at school? they wouldn’t check the homework books? just before reaching school had the feeling that there would be a board saying its a holiday?

Today it happened again, even though we have a court order against us, and on us for quite some time so that it has actually sunk in, we still harbor a secret hope. Hope that at the last moment some miracle man would save us, some miracle from god would bend the rules for us.

The trickiest part of the this effect is actually defining it. Because in the bare sense, delusion of reprieve is nothing but hope. And isn’t hope a good thing? a virtue to possess? Yes it is, and the trick lies in understanding when Hope turns into the delusion of reprieve. I’m not gonna try to define the line of distinction as its a changing line based on context and relevance. It is different for all of us, but what’s important and the actual objective of this post is to realize there exists a place to which we can descend into, where hope becomes insanity. So the next time you are locked in a box, ask yourself, is this hope tingling under my skin or is it the insane delusion of reprieve leading me to the fool’s paradise?

~*~

Part 4: Jodhpur

The Blue City

Google maps is a life saver. It helps lost souls find their way. But on a bad day it can easily go the other way. We left from Jaisalmer just as the sun had started going down. It had thus far been a great day. Good places, good people and great food of Jaisalmer had left us wanting. But as plans go, we had to move on. Next stop Jodhpur – the Blue city. We were eager to get to Jodhpur, and in our eagerness made the one mistake that made subjected us to one of the hardest commutes we’d seen so far. We turned on google maps destined to Jodhpur while still in Jaisalmer city limits.

The Wrong Way

The main route taken to reach Jodhpur is the one that goes via Chandan, Pokhran and Dechu. This is a 4 lane highway and has tolls on the way. I’m not sure what google thought of us but she showed us a non-toll route that went through the countryside and maybe even through a forest. It was a single road – just two lanes with no clear onward and return sides. Over that we have a bizarre incidence where saw the carcass of a cow or some big animal like a deer or a camel right in the middle of the road. We slowed down, there was no one on the road, no vehicles, no homes, no people, just that carcass. Maybe it was a trap laid to get us? We didn’t stop, didn’t click photos, just escaped.

As on the previous day, we reached Jodhpur in the middle of the night. Our hotel had a wonderful view of the Mehrangarh fort, but sadly that meant the hotel was 125 feet below the fort and right in the center of the town – a town of narrow streets and open drains. It was frustrating enough that the hotel wasn’t perfectly pinned on google, but the midnight traffic was what got us really riled up. At 1 AM in the mid night people are riding around in their bikes at top speed! It was insane, insanity that we endured and finally found the hotel. It was a residential building modified into a hotel, and the promised parking was on the road – which our expert drivers struggled to mitigate.

Our day started with a visit to the central clock tower. Natives called it the Ghanta Ghar. It’s a tall tower in trade mark Jodhpuri architecture. The tower is surrounded by markets on 3 sides, including street markets that sold cloths, leather articles, plastic and wooden toys and a lot of things that looked like souvenirs for tourists. There isn’t much to talk or appreciate about the clock tower except that its a popular local land mark and though its right in the middle of the street, it makes for some decent photos.

Next on the list, the Mehrangarh fort. The fort itself is an awe inspiring site. The lofty towers, the thick walls and the shade of age on them makes it as imposing as it can get. There is another monument called Jaswant Thada close to it. It’s practically in the same premises as fort but very tranquil and serene in comparison to the fort. Given the fact that the monument is basically a place built to offer homage to the kings gone by, it is practically a tomb, just that there are no dead bodies in the place – perhaps because they were all hindu kings. There inner hall of the monument has photos and biographies of the kings, and is surrounded by a quite garden with bougainvillea trees and a serene lake on the outside. We saw a couple are artists trying to sketch the monument, so we stood for a while to catch them in action. It is said the Thada continues to serve as the cremation ground for the royal family. One of the interesting and humorous things about the place was the numerous No Selfie Zone signs.

The Mehrangarh fort has huge entryways and huge double doors which would’ve made for beautiful photos if not for the never ending hoards of people. There were also school trips and pilgrims among the crowd. Like most forts and palaces, this is also a huge museum. The exhibits can be categories as pictures of royalty, models depicting battles and other history, armoury of the royal army, and a special section of the museum dedicated just to the turbans! The fort has long corridors lined with photos, and a lot of rooms showcasing all the different remnants of the royal family and their lifestyle. There were numerous gift shops and other pop up shops in the fort. Rajasthani poppets, cotton cloths, turbans, exhotic metal utensis among other things.

The fort also housed a temple of ma chamunda devi. It is said that one of the kings of the province was a devotee of the goddess and had made the temple in the fort premises. The temple is in the compound of the fort, but is to be approached via the roof. The roof in itself is a showcase. It houses numerous canons of different time periods and makes for good photos. The view of the city from the roof top reminds us why this is called the Blue city.

Jodhour is known for its sweets. Jalebis, Ghewars, barfis and laddoos of a million kind. Unfortunately we had no time hunting down authentic places to eat as the fort had taken up nearly 3 hours and it was almost 2 PM. Sticking to our ambitions plan meant we would have to leave the city in less than 2 hours if we were to reach Jaipur before nightfall. We did find a Haldirams and ordered some delicious Raj Kachori to end our day in Jodhpur on a sweet note.

~*~

PS: We missed the Umaid Bhavan palace. Though the palace is visible from Jaswant Thada, its not like actually visiting the place, is it?

A Girl in Red

It was the weirdest part of the trip. What was supposed to be a 4 nights 5 days trip in the himalayas was gonna go wrong. OK calm yourself, no one died, no one broke anything and no one was lost.


It so happened that my company had taken on a stupid stupid client and we were trying make a lending software for this hard nosed stupid ass. I was the BA leading the calls and I messed up. Well, that’s another story, maybe for another day, but for now there was a stupid stupid client that I couldn’t drop and I was in the Himalayas.

With regret I had told my guys I was gonna stay back in Mcleodganj. The initial plan was to drive up to Manali from Mcleodganj, try skiing and any other adventure sports available and maybe play in the snow! But I couldn’t. So the guys went ahead to on the trip and I stayed back alone in the hotel room with my laptop. There was no heating in the room and there was no room service in the hotel.

The guys left for Manali early in the morning, at around 5:30 AM. I just woke up to see them off and went back to bed. No one was gonna be in office before 10. I don’t need to log in at 5:30 to prove anything. To my pleasant surprise, when I woke up by 9:30 AM, there was snow! It had started snowing in Mcleodganj in the 4 hours that I had been asleep since the guys left! The gods must really like me to have made it snow so that I didn’t miss seeing snow! It was the first time I saw snow in my life and it did feel new and fresh and unique. I walked out to the front porch of the hotel and stepped on the snow. Took a couple of steps and turned around to see my foot steps in the snow. The feeling was surreal. I had just taken 3 steps on flat ground in front of the hotel and it got me excited. So weird!

The kids who were manning the hotel started playing in the snow. A couple of them started making snowballs and throwing at each other. The 3rd kid wrote a girl’s name in the snow and was taking selfies with it. They were not kids per say, they might’ve been 18-20 years old but they were playing in the snow like they were 8 year olds! Snow is the beach of the highlanders I suppose.

I asked if breakfast was available, there was nothing in the hotel. Not even noodles or eggs or bread or even chai. I was asked to walk down to a small town center, a center circle like the town plaza which had a line of shops. I decided to take the chance. It’s not like I was hungry, but I liked the snow and a walk in the snow and a spicy fried egg seemed more inviting than drafting lengthy unconvincing mails.

I wore literally all the cloths I had with me. I hadn’t packed mustang, so I wore my thermal inners, 3 layers of cloths on top and then the only jacket I had. Gloves, socks, shoes and the cap too. I started walking down, the snow wasn’t think and since it was the first day of snow, there was no frost and it was easy to walk. I walked down to the plaza and found a neat eaterie. It had colorful interiors and looked like a library cafe. I picked up a political magazine, quite an anomaly in the otherwise “love all – no boundary nation ” theme of the cafe.

As I walked in I noticed there was no one else in the cafe. I was afraid I was gonna be turned down, but thankfully not. Another 18-19 or 20ish kid came up and took my order. I ordered a masala egg and cup of hot latte. He wrote it down, turned on the music to loud blast, gave me smile and ran down. It felt good, I was important. Perhaps in the himalayas when there is snow and bad weather all around, even a single customer ordering a single egg is important.

I ate my egg slowly sipping the latte. It had stopped snowing and there was noise outside. It was a Monday, so children had started going out to school. Few other eateries started playing music and other shops and establishments started opening up. Each with one or two guests.

A few kids, again 20ish kids had started playing cricket in what looked like a small park. There were some younger kids and some older ones. In fact the older ones were the kids who were running these cafes. They all played together but ran different cafes. Seems strange at first, but guess that’t the life in mountains.

I walked back to my room shivering in the snow. A girl in a red knee length coat was walking down towards the plaza. She was alone and didn’t look like a tourist. Our eyes locked, I nodded as a way of wishing the morning and she gave me a smile. I never saw her again, but the memory of this split second exchange of warmth still keeps me warm on cold lonely nights.

~*~

AMA on Thursdays – RJ Sudeep

Today’s AMA is with a friend, well most are. This is with Sudeep Shenoy or known as RJ to his friends owing to the colorful job he held at a city radio station for a couple of years. Recently he started a freelancer job at a bike taxi aggregator called Rapido. Like all middle class Indians I was taken a little aback. We are more than obsessed with the words dignity of labour and hence I was a little out of air when I heard he had given up on looking for a mainstream job and pull a taxi. Hence the AMA with RJ.

Q. Do you agree for an AMA style interview over whatsapp that will be posted on a public blog?
RJ: Whatever that means, you are my big fans.

Friends right? They always wanna play it cool

Q. First off, what made you do Rapido? No judgement here but you are quite qualified to do a lot of other things. Why choose to ferry people on your bike?

OK so its not about qualification. One thing is I don’t like sitting in one place doing a desk job. Secondly I love riding. I love going on a 2 whleer and then Rapido came along and I thought Why not. Instead of roaming around not doing anything I might as well do Rapido and make some money.

Also another reason is I understand how difficult transportation can be. Especially when you want to go somewhere, travel economically and reach somewhere on time. For example there have been times when I thought I might miss a train taking a Rapido I’ve made it to the station, and today I have so many customers going to the train station in a hurry. Rapido really is the answer to our modern-day traffic problems. It sometimes you feel you are doing a social service. Moreover you get to meet so many different people, not that I’ve kept it touch with anyone but I’ve had so many memorable conversations. Almost 90% of the times its been a good experience. People are mostly respectful and so colorful.

In fact since I was young I wanted to try different things, I wanted to try something I called a 30 day employment challenge where I would try one different job each day. This was long back, maybe in 2007 or 08. But it didn’t work I didn’t get a lot of support, as in from people who could actually give me jobs. But I enjoy doing different things, hence Rapido is not surprising.

Q. Its interesting, the 30 days employment challenge. Can you talk more? Did you write down a plan on what jobs you would try? And what happened? How many jobs were you able to try?

This was when I was 18 or 19 I guess. Definitely not when I was doing my masters. It was when I had started hosting events as an MC. I was doing my own events and hence was meeting a lot of people. People from various walks of life and hence getting excited about everyone. I wasn’t looking to get paid, it was just the excitement and curiosity of the different jobs.

Unfortunately not many people wanted to give me jobs, like for example I wanted to be a doctor’s assistant, obviously I couldn’t become a doctor, so I tried to be an assistance but even that had a lot of protocols and I could do it. I couldn’t be a cop either, but they said I could be a traffic warden, which I tried. I did a teacher thing, I did social welfare volunteering thing, I did an MC and I think I did about 5-6 random things. In future if I get a chance to do it I would do it again.

He actually went on to say that he’d like to see it in school curriculum where children get to experience different things. His idea was that knowing what different people did would actually help put children in each other’s shoes and reduce the condescending and judging that we do to each other.

Q. Can you talk about some interesting people you met while doing Rapido?

RJ: A lot of interesting rides. Doctors rushing to hospitals, people who wanted to reach railway stations. I got a drunkard who was abusive on the phone. I went ahead and completed the ride in spite of it. There are lot of rides that are very far off from the city. I also remember one ride in the rain, where the customer asked me why I don’t have a rain coat for the pillion. It gets funny sometimes too. Now I’m actually getting to see what auto drivers go through. The pains of not getting return rides and barely breaking even. It’s a wonder how they make ends meet.

Q. I remember once you said you got a booking of a person without limbs? Can you tell us what that experience was like?

RJ: Yes, once I got a booking in a college. I big university like campus and the booking was inside the campus. The person asked me to come right into the college. Like literally into the quadrangle of the college. I went there with difficulty and then I saw a person who’s 1/3 my height. He literally had no lower body. No belly, no thighs, no legs, nothing, and he was all alone. I wasn’t as shocked at his appearance as I was anxious of the next events. He asked me to get the bike as close as possible to the wall. He then used the walls and hopped on to my bike like a gymnast. I was shocked. I was scared while driving the bike as mine is more of a sports bike, but he was confident and has such a pleasant personality. He got off at a mall just like he’d got on, like a gymnast. I didn’t feel like taking his money, but I didn’t want to treat him any differently and hence accepted the fare.

Q. I know you had a corporate job, and as you said you’re not a desk job kind of person. Did you have any adventures with entrepreneurship?

RJ: I was bored. Slogging long work hours, managing to butter people, struggle through office politics and then endure judgmental process of ratings. I just couldn’t take it.

And about entrepreneurship, me and my boss at TCS did start off together to form a social media management consultancy. He initially quit his job and started something else, a year later I quit TCS too, by then he had already failed at his start up, so we decided to start something a fresh and hope that we didnt fail. We’re still at it, but just taking a little break right now.

Q. Talking of Rapido again, you seem to suggest most people using Rapido are nice, but what about how you see them? Do you judge them as cheapskates who can’t hire a cab or an auto? or Is judging not part of the job?

RJ: Not really, its more of a convenience thing than about money. If you think about it, its common sense. I car or an auto takes way longer to get somewhere than a bike. And Rapido is not always cheaper than an auto. So definitely can’t call them cheapskates, and as I said earlier, I’ve learnt a lot about judgement and prejudice from Rapido, so its obvious that I make sure I never judge anyone

Q. The RJ question. How did it happen and why did you leave that?

This was a long time ago. Way back when Mangalore didn’t have private radio stations. There is no exciting story, I just saw an ad in the paper inviting applicants for an audition. This was when I was in 11th-12th class, so naturally my mom was against it and hence I dropped it.

A few years later I met an RJ from Radio Mirchi while going to a mall. We struck a conversation and instantly hit it off. He even invited me to the radio station after college where I hung out with the RJs and had a nice time. That was when I was introduced to community radio station called Radio Saarang. Its a unique concept where anyone in the community could be an RJ. My mum didn’t have any objections this time.

By this time I was already doing good at Radio Saarang. It was at this point that I decided I wanted to be in Media. I took up a course in mass media and journalism instead of the regular engineering that everyone thought I might also end up in. This is where I did a 16 hour long marathon presentation on the radio. I was the youngest RJ to do this.

To answer your question of why I gave it up. It was starting to become like any job, repetitive and mundane. Hence I moved on, but the experience of being with the people, being in the news excited me and so I decided to stay in the media field.

Q. Last question, I have to admit I only thought of interviewing you because of Rapido. So the important question to you is, do you see such blue collar jobs coming to the mainstream? and Do you think our society is ready to see and treat people doing Blue collar jobs in the same light as the next guy with a regular day job?

I think it is already happening. A few years if an educated person was pulling an Uber or Ola people would laugh at you, but now people are actually pleasantly surprised and approve of it. Its an added income and people see it that way.

Ofcourse its not everyone’s cup of tea. It requires firstly to break the mental block of doing a blue collar job and not to mention it is physically and mentally challenging. And you need an aptitude to actually do a driver’s job all day. Its not that anyone without a job can do it, you need to like driving, atleast a little more than the next person.

As for mainstream jobs, I don’t think this would replace your mainstream jobs per say. All your jobs are safe – you will find enough engineers or doctors or anything else. Its your classic supply demand scenario. There weren’t enough Olas and Ubers and hence there was an opportunity, but now the market has saturated itself and it doesn’t really make sense to quit your day job and start driving to make some money.

These AMAs is not with celebrities or anyone special, but general ordinary folk who happen have a colorful personality. After all, it is the ordinary that gives rise to the extraordinary.

~*~